Masks are Required in the Library

by order of the Town of Andover Select Board, September 13, 2021

Memorial Hall Library

Indigenous History

MHL will be closed on Monday, October 11th, in observance of Columbus Day and Indigenous Peoples' Day. Come in over the weekend to stock up on books about the history of indigenous people in North America. (Spoiler alert: although your school textbooks might not have mentioned it, indigenous people were here before the First Thanksgiving and are still here!)

An indigenous peoples' history of the United States
An indigenous peoples' history of the United States
by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the indigenous peoples was genocidal and imperialist, designed to crush the original inhabitants. Spanning more than 300 years, a classic bottom-up history significantly reframes how we view our past. Told from the viewpoint of the indigenous, it reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the U.S. empire.
Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians but Were Afraid to Ask : Young Readers Edition
Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians but Were Afraid to Ask : Young Readers Edition
by Anton Treuer

From the acclaimed Ojibwe author and professor Anton Treuer comes an essential book of questions and answers for Native and non-Native young readers alike. Ranging from "Why is there such a fuss about nonnative people wearing Indian costumes for Halloween?" to "Why is it called a 'traditional Indian fry bread taco'?" to "What's it like for natives who don't look native?" to "Why are Indians so often imagined rather than understood?", and beyond, Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask (Young Readers Edition) does exactly what its title says for young readers, in a style consistently thoughtful, personal, and engaging. 
An indigenous peoples' history of the United States for young people
An indigenous peoples' history of the United States for young people
by Debbie Reese

Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history.
Lakota America : a new history of indigenous power
Lakota America : a new history of indigenous power
by Pekka Hämäläinen

The first comprehensive history of the Lakota Indians and their profound role in shaping America's history. This first complete account of the Lakota Indians traces their rich and often surprising history from the early sixteenth to the early twenty-first century. Pekka Hamalainen explores the Lakotas' roots as marginal hunter-gatherers and reveals how they reinvented themselves twice: first as a river people who dominated the Missouri Valley, America's great commercial artery, and then-in what was America's first sweeping westward expansion-as a horse people who ruled supreme on the vast high plains. The Lakotas are imprinted in American historical memory. Red Cloud, Crazy Horse, and Sitting Bull are iconic figures in the American imagination, but in this groundbreaking book they emerge as something different: the architects of Lakota America, an expansive and enduring Indigenous regime that commanded human fates in the North American interior for generations. Hamalainen's deeply researched and engagingly written history places the Lakotas at the center of American history, and the results are revelatory.
This land is their land : the Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the troubled history of Thanksgiving
This land is their land : the Wampanoag Indians, Plymouth Colony, and the troubled history of Thanksgiving
by David J. Silverman

The author of Thundersticks presents an account of the Plymouth colony’s founding that incorporates the perspectives of Wampanoag witnesses and contributors, documenting the events that led to the creation and violent dissolution of essential peace agreements
God, war, and Providence : the epic struggle of Roger Williams and the Narragansett Indians against the Puritans of New England
God, war, and Providence : the epic struggle of Roger Williams and the Narragansett Indians against the Puritans of New England
by James A Warren

The tragic and fascinating history of the first epic struggle between white settlers and Native Americans in the early seventeenth century: a fresh look at the aggressive expansionist Puritans in New England and the determined Narragansett Indians, who refused to back down and accept English authority over people and their land.
Surviving genocide : native nations and the United States from the American Revolution to bleeding Kansas
Surviving genocide : native nations and the United States from the American Revolution to bleeding Kansas
by Jeffrey Ostler

In the first part of this sweeping two-volume history, Jeffrey Ostler investigates how American democracy relied on Indian dispossession and the federally sanctioned use of force to remove or slaughter Indians in the way of U.S. expansion. He charts the losses that Indians suffered from relentless violence and upheaval and the attendant effects of disease, deprivation, and exposure. This volume centers on the eastern United States from the 1750s to the start of the Civil War. An authoritative contribution to the history of the United States' violent path toward building a continental empire, this ambitious and well-researched book deepens our understanding of the seizure of indigenous lands, including the use of treaties to create the appearance of Native consent to dispossession. Ostler also carefully documents the resilience of Native people, showing how they survived genocide by creating alliances, defending their towns, and rebuilding their communities
Unworthy republic : the dispossession of Native Americans and the road to Indian territory
Unworthy republic : the dispossession of Native Americans and the road to Indian territory
by Claudio Saunt

A history of the 1830s forced migration of indigenous populations to territories west of the Mississippi describes the government-driven fraud, intimidation and murder that were used to confiscate Native American homelands and property.
Murder at the mission : a frontier killing, its legacy of lies, and the taking of the American West
Murder at the mission : a frontier killing, its legacy of lies, and the taking of the American West
by Blaine Harden

Documents the early 19th-century story of the Whitman and Spalding missionary families, exploring how after becoming the first Americans to cross the Rockies by covered wagon they embarked on propagandist agendas that fueled a massive and culturally catastrophic westward migration. 
The three-cornered war : the Union, the Confederacy, and native peoples in the fight for the West
The three-cornered war : the Union, the Confederacy, and native peoples in the fight for the West
by Megan Kate Nelson

A deeply researched narrative account of the lesser-known pursuit of Western expansion during the American Civil War provides coverage of the lesser-known contributions of nine individuals who fought to secure strategic Western territories. 
The heartbeat of Wounded Knee : native America from 1890 to the present
The heartbeat of Wounded Knee : native America from 1890 to the present
by David Treuer

An anthropologist's chronicle of Native American life from the Wounded Knee massacre to the present traces the unprecedented resourcefulness and reinvention of distinct tribe cultures that assimilated into mainstream life to preserve Native identity.
Undefeated : Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football team
Undefeated : Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football team
by Steve Sheinkin

A great American sport and Native American history come together in this true story of how Jim Thorpe and Pop Warner created the legendary Carlisle Indians football team.
Why we serve : Native Americans in the United States Armed Forces
Why we serve : Native Americans in the United States Armed Forces
by Alexandra N. Harris

American Indians have served in our nation's military since colonial times. Throughout Indian Country, servicemen and women are some of the most honored members of their communities. Charged by Congress with creating a memorial on its grounds, the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) will dedicate the National Native American Veterans Memorial in fall 2020 to give all Americans the opportunity "to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans." Why We Serve commemorates the opening of the memorial through the history of Native military service in all its complexity, from colonial Native nations who forged alliances, attempting to preserve their sovereignty, to contemporary individuals celebrating their Indigenous culture while fighting in foreign conflicts.
Like a hurricane : the Indian movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee
Like a hurricane : the Indian movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee
by Paul Chaat Smith

Two Native American authors combine federal archival material and interviews with numerous insiders to describe the growth of the American Indian Movement, focusing on the occupation of Alcatrax, the 1972 storming of Washington's BIA office, and the seizure of Wounded Knee.
Redbone : the true story of a Native American rock band
Redbone : the true story of a Native American rock band
by Christian Staebler

Presents the history of the Native American rock band Redbone, who rose to fame while maintaining their cultural identity, and took a stand as the American Indian Movement in the 1970s gained momentum.
Send a Runner : A Navajo Honors the Long Walk
Send a Runner : A Navajo Honors the Long Walk
by Edison Eskeets

The Navajo tribe, the Diné, are the largest tribe in the United States and live across the American Southwest. But over a century ago, they were nearly wiped out by the Long Walk, a forced removal of most of the Diné people to a military-controlled reservation in New Mexico. The summer of 2018 marked the 150th anniversary of the Navajos' return to their homelands. One Navajo family and their community decided to honor that return. Edison Eskeets and his family organized a ceremonial run from Spider Rock in Canyon de Chelly, Arizona, to Santa Fé, New Mexico, in order to deliver a message and to honor the survivors of the Long Walk. Both exhilarating and punishing, Send a Runner tells the story of a Navajo family using the power of running to honor their ancestors and the power of history to explain why the Long Walk happened. From these forces, they might also seek the vision of how the Diné--their people--will have a future.
#Notyourprincess : voices of Native American women
#Notyourprincess : voices of Native American women
by Lisa Charleyboy

A collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art exhibit the voices of Indigenous women across North America.
Standoff : Standing Rock, the Bundy movement, and the American story sacred lands
Standoff : Standing Rock, the Bundy movement, and the American story sacred lands
by Jacqueline Keeler

Native young people and elders pray in sweat lodges at the Océti Sakówin camp, the North Dakota landscape outside blanketed in snow. In Oregon, white men and women in army surplus and western gear, some draped in the American flag, gather in the buildings of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge. The world witnessed two standoffs in 2016: the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest against an oil pipeline in North Dakota and the armed takeover of Oregon's Malheur Wildlife Refuge led by the Bundy family. These events unfolded in vastly different ways, from media coverage to the reactions of law enforcement. In Standoff, Jacqueline Keeler examines these episodes as two sides of the same story that created America and its deep-rooted cultural conflicts.
The Bears Ears : a human history of America's most endangered wilderness
The Bears Ears : a human history of America's most endangered wilderness
by David Roberts

A personal and historical exploration of the Bears Ears country and the fight to save a national monument. The Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah, created by President Obama in 2016 and eviscerated by President Trump in 2017, contains more archaeological sites than any other region in the United States. It's also a spectacularly beautiful landscape, a mosaic of sandstone canyons and bold mesas and buttes. This wilderness, now threatened by oil and gas drilling, unrestricted grazing, and invasion by jeep and ATV, is at the center of the greatest environmental battle in America since the damming of the Colorado River to create Lake Powell in the 1950s. In The Bears Ears, acclaimed adventure writer David Roberts takes readers on a tour of his favorite place on earth as he unfolds the rich and contradictory human history of the 1.35 million acres of the Bears Ears domain. Weaving personal memoir with archival research, Roberts sings the praises of the outback he's explored for the last twenty-five years.
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